Effect of basal conditions on the magnitude and dynamics of the blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI response

Eric R. Cohen, Kamil Ugurbil, Seong Gi Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

283 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of the basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) on both the magnitude and dynamics of the functional hemodynamic response in humans has not been fully investigated. Thus, the hemodynamic response to visual stimulation was measured using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in human subjects in a 7-T magnetic field under different basal conditions: hypocapnia, normocapnia, and hypercapnia. Hypercapnia was induced by inhalation of a 5% carbon dioxide gas mixture and hypocapnia was produced by hyperventilation. As the fMRI baseline signal increased linearly with expired CO2 from hypocapnic to hypercapnic levels, the magnitude of the BOLD response to visual stimulation decreased linearly. Measures of the dynamics of the visually evoked BOLD response (onset time, full-width-at-half-maximum, and time-to-peak) increased linearly with the basal fMRI signal and the end-tidal CO2 level. The basal CBF level, modulated by the arterial partial pressure of CO2, significantly affects both the magnitude and dynamics of the BOLD response induced by neural activity. These results suggest that caution should be exercised when comparing stimulus-induced fMRI responses under different physiologic or pharmacologic states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1042-1053
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Keywords

  • Autoregulation
  • Brain mapping
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Functional MRI
  • Hypercapnia
  • Hypocapnia
  • Pharmacological MRI

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