Effect of a chelated calcium proteinate dietary supplement on the reproductive performance of large white turkey breeder hens

J. L. Grimes, S. Noll, J. Brannon, J. L. Godwin, J. C. Smith, R. D. Rowland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Researchers have reported that organic mineral complexes can have increased availability compared with inorganic sources. This work was conducted to examine the inclusion of a small amount of chelated calcium proteinate (CalKey) into turkey breeder hen diets and its effect on turkey breeder hen performance. Two studies were conducted, one each in Minnesota (A) and North Carolina (B). Typical corn and soybean meal diets without animal by-product meals were used as the control diets. Hens in the first study were photostimulated at 30 wk of age in December with 15L:9D for a 24-wk lay period, and hens in a second study were photostimulated after an induced molt in January with 15.5L:8.5D for a 24-wk lay period. In study A, hatchability of fertile eggs was improved during the last 4 wk of production for hens fed calcium proteinate. During 1 period, hens fed calcium proteinate had lower daily feed intake and increased incidence of soft-shelled eggs. In study B, hatchability of fertile eggs was improved for hens fed dietary calcium proteinate for 19 and 20 wk of lay. This result was associated with improved embryo livability for wk 3 and 4 of development. It was concluded that feeding 500 ppm calcium from chelated calcium proteinate improved hatchability of turkey eggs during the later period of egg production, which was associated with decreased late embryo mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-649
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Poultry Research
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Chelated calcium proteinate
  • Egg fertility
  • Egg hatchability
  • Egg production
  • Reproduction
  • Turkey breeder hen

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