Educating homeless and highly mobile students: Implications of research on risk and resilience

Ann S. Masten, Aria E. Fiat, Madelyn H. Labella, Ryan A. Strack

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Homelessness among children in poverty continues to confront schools, educators, and policymakers with major challenges. This commentary summarizes findings from 2 decades of research on academic risk and resilience in children experiencing homelessness. Recent research corroborates the early conclusion that although children experiencing homelessness share many risks with other disadvantaged children, they fall higher on a continuum of cumulative risk. Research also indicates resilience, with many homeless students succeeding in school. Implications for educational practice, training, research, and policy are discussed, particularly regarding school psychology. Evidence underscores the importance of identification, assessment, and administrative data; outreach and communication to ensure that mandated educational rights of homeless children are met; and coordinating education across schools and systems to provide continuity of services and learning. Early childhood education, screening, and access to quality programs are important for preventing achievement disparities that emerge early and persist among these students. Additional research is needed to inform, improve, and evaluate interventions to mitigate risk and promote school success of students facing homelessness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-330
Number of pages16
JournalSchool Psychology Review
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Homeless Persons
resilience
homelessness
Students
Research
student
homeless child
school
Homeless Youth
Education
school success
school education
Vulnerable Populations
Poverty
educational practice
continuity
psychology
childhood
Communication
Learning

Cite this

Educating homeless and highly mobile students : Implications of research on risk and resilience. / Masten, Ann S.; Fiat, Aria E.; Labella, Madelyn H.; Strack, Ryan A.

In: School Psychology Review, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 315-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Masten, Ann S. ; Fiat, Aria E. ; Labella, Madelyn H. ; Strack, Ryan A. / Educating homeless and highly mobile students : Implications of research on risk and resilience. In: School Psychology Review. 2015 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 315-330.
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