Editorial: Subclinical Psychopathology and the Developing Brain

Dawson C. Hill, Kathryn Regan Cullen

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

Abstract

Adolescence is an important developmental window, characterized by critical changes in brain development (eg cortical thinning), and also by the peak time of onset for many mental health disorders. 1 Understanding the neurodevelopmental roots of psychopathology has been a major focus in our field. Researchers have been charged with providing the foundational knowledge needed to guide the design of effective, neurobiologically based prevention and early intervention efforts. 2 Although we have made some gains, we still have far to go. The questions that need to be answered require large-scale, longitudinal studies examining brain development beginning early in life, prior to the onset of mental health disorders, with repeated, multi-level assessments to understand the intertwining cascade of alterations in brain, behavior, and experience over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1183-1184
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume60
Issue number10
Early online dateApr 19 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Disclosure: Dr. Cullen has received grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the University of Minnesota. She has served on a grant review committee for NIH and received honoraria. She has received honoraria for serving on an advisory committee for the Food and Drug Administration. Mr. Hill has reported no biomedical financial interests or potential conflicts of interest.

Funding Information:
The authors have reported no funding for this work. Disclosure: Dr. Cullen has received grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the University of Minnesota. She has served on a grant review committee for NIH and received honoraria. She has received honoraria for serving on an advisory committee for the Food and Drug Administration. Mr. Hill has reported no biomedical financial interests or potential conflicts of interest.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

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