Ectopic secretion of chorionic gonadotropin by a lung carcinoma. Pituitary gonadotropin and subunit secretion and prolonged chemotherapeutic remission

Stewart A. Metz, Bruce Weintraub, Saul W. Rosen, Jack Singer, R. Paul Robertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of tumor markers to improve cancer therapy is not established. We studied a man with a human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-secreting large cell carcinoma of the lung and gynecomastia. Preoperatively, levels of HCG (109 ng/ml), its alpha and beta subunits (3.2 and 21 ng/ml, respectively) and plasma estradiol were elevated. Despite apparently complete tumor resection and total resolution of gynecomastia, HCG titers remained elevated (3.3 ng/ml), heralding tumor recurrence three weeks later. Because the pathophysiologic consequences of the ectopic secretion of HCG on pituitary function are not established, we administered 100 μg of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (LHRH) and observed a markedly delayed increase in pituitary gonadotropins. Early chemotherapy, guided by persistence of HCG, reduced HCG to undetectable levels, restored to normal the response to LHRH and resulted in a distinctly unusual 30-month complete remission. Use of HCG as a tumor marker levels is more sensitive than the symptom of gynecomastia and may permit detection of small, potentially curable tumor foci.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-333
Number of pages9
JournalThe American Journal of Medicine
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1978

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Pituitary Gonadotropins
Chorionic Gonadotropin
Carcinoma
Lung
Gynecomastia
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
Tumor Biomarkers
Neoplasms
Large Cell Carcinoma
Estradiol
Recurrence
Drug Therapy

Cite this

Ectopic secretion of chorionic gonadotropin by a lung carcinoma. Pituitary gonadotropin and subunit secretion and prolonged chemotherapeutic remission. / Metz, Stewart A.; Weintraub, Bruce; Rosen, Saul W.; Singer, Jack; Robertson, R. Paul.

In: The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 65, No. 2, 08.1978, p. 325-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Metz, Stewart A. ; Weintraub, Bruce ; Rosen, Saul W. ; Singer, Jack ; Robertson, R. Paul. / Ectopic secretion of chorionic gonadotropin by a lung carcinoma. Pituitary gonadotropin and subunit secretion and prolonged chemotherapeutic remission. In: The American Journal of Medicine. 1978 ; Vol. 65, No. 2. pp. 325-333.
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