Ecological momentary assessment of the snacking environments of children from racially/ethnically diverse households

Katie A. Loth, Allan D. Tate, Amanda Trofholz, Jennifer Orlet Fisher, Laura Miller, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Jerica M. Berge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children consume nearly one-third of their daily energy intake as snacks (i.e., eating occasions that occur between meals); thus there is a growing interest in understanding what snacking occasions look like in the homes of young children. This study makes use of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to 1) examine differences in the contextual factors, including location, food preparation style, people present, presence of media devices, and overall atmosphere, between meal and snack occasions; and 2) explore differences in the context of snacking occasions across children's gender and weight status. Data for the current study came from the Family Matters Study, which included 150 families with children aged 5–7 years old (n = 25 from each of the following groups: Black/African American, Hispanic, Hmong, Native American, Somali, White). Parents completed an 8-day EMA observation period, during which they were surveyed after each eating occasion with the study child; questions explored contextual factors including location, food preparation style, people present, presence of media devices, and the overall atmosphere of each eating occasion. Differences between meals and snacks were observed; a smaller percentage of snacks (compared to meals) were prepared by the parent, consisted of only homemade food, and were planned ahead of time, as opposed to being served in response to a child's request. Snacks were more likely than other meals to be eaten on the couch and in the presence of a screen. Furthermore, important differences in snacking context were observed by child gender and weight status. Findings illuminate opportunities to improve children's overall dietary intake via interventions focused on improving the quality of foods served during snacks, as well as the contextual environment in which snacks are eaten.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104497
JournalAppetite
Volume145
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Fingerprint

Snacks
Meals
Eating
Atmosphere
Food
Ecological Momentary Assessment
Weights and Measures
Equipment and Supplies
Food Quality
Asian Americans
North American Indians
Energy Intake
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Parents
Observation

Keywords

  • Children
  • Cross-sectional
  • Dietary intake
  • Ecological momentary assessment
  • Home environment
  • Nutrition
  • Observational study
  • Snacking

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Ecological momentary assessment of the snacking environments of children from racially/ethnically diverse households. / Loth, Katie A.; Tate, Allan D.; Trofholz, Amanda; Fisher, Jennifer Orlet; Miller, Laura; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Berge, Jerica M.

In: Appetite, Vol. 145, 104497, 01.02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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