Eco-evolutionary dynamics of range expansion

Tom E.X. Miller, Amy L. Angert, Carissa D. Brown, Julie A. Lee-Yaw, Mark Lewis, Frithjof Lutscher, Nathan G. Marculis, Brett A. Melbourne, Allison K. Shaw, Marianna Szűcs, Olivia Tabares, Takuji Usui, Christopher Weiss-Lehman, Jennifer L. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding the movement of species’ ranges is a classic ecological problem that takes on urgency in this era of global change. Historically treated as a purely ecological process, range expansion is now understood to involve eco-evolutionary feedbacks due to spatial genetic structure that emerges as populations spread. We synthesize empirical and theoretical work on the eco-evolutionary dynamics of range expansion, with emphasis on bridging directional, deterministic processes that favor evolved increases in dispersal and demographic traits with stochastic processes that lead to the random fixation of alleles and traits. We develop a framework for understanding the joint influence of these processes in changing the mean and variance of expansion speed and its underlying traits. Our synthesis of recent laboratory experiments supports the consistent role of evolution in accelerating expansion speed on average, and highlights unexpected diversity in how evolution can influence variability in speed: results not well predicted by current theory. We discuss and evaluate support for three classes of modifiers of eco-evolutionary range dynamics (landscape context, trait genetics, and biotic interactions), identify emerging themes, and suggest new directions for future work in a field that stands to increase in relevance as populations move in response to global change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere03139
JournalEcology
Volume101
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This manuscript is the product of a working group supported by the Canadian Institute for Ecology and Evolution and hosted by the University of British Columbia?s Biodiversity Research Centre. We thank V. Rudolf, B. Bachelot, S. Carter, J. Neale, J. Fowler, and two anonymous reviewers for helpful input on the manuscript. Our research on the ecology and evolution of species? ranges has been supported by NSF-DEB-1501814 and Sevilleta LTER award NSF-DEB-1748133 (TEXM); NSF-DEB-1555883 (ALA); NSF OISE-1159097 (AKS); NSF-DEB-0949595 and NSF-DEB-1457660 (BAM); NSF-DEB-1601333 (BAM and CWL); USDA-NIFA Hatch project 1017601 and Michigan State University AgBioResearch (MS); NSERC Discovery Grants (J. L. Williams, M. A. Lewis, and A. L. Angert); and a UBC International Doctoral Fellowship (T. Usui). Statement of authorship: All authors are members of a working group that developed the content of this article over a 4-d meeting. J. L. Williams and T. E. X. Miller organized the working group and drafted the manuscript. T. Usui prepared Appendix S2 and conducted the meta-analysis; C. Weiss-Lehman drafted Appendix S1. All authors contributed edits in preparation for manuscript submission.

Funding Information:
This manuscript is the product of a working group supported by the Canadian Institute for Ecology and Evolution and hosted by the University of British Columbia’s Biodiversity Research Centre. We thank V. Rudolf, B. Bachelot, S. Carter, J. Neale, J. Fowler, and two anonymous reviewers for helpful input on the manuscript. Our research on the ecology and evolution of species’ ranges has been supported by NSF‐DEB‐1501814 and Sevilleta LTER award NSF‐DEB‐1748133 (TEXM); NSF‐DEB‐1555883 (ALA); NSF OISE‐1159097 (AKS); NSF‐DEB‐0949595 and NSF‐DEB‐1457660 (BAM); NSF‐DEB‐1601333 (BAM and CWL); USDA‐NIFA Hatch project 1017601 and Michigan State University AgBioResearch (MS); NSERC Discovery Grants (J. L. Williams, M. A. Lewis, and A. L. Angert); and a UBC International Doctoral Fellowship (T. Usui). Statement of authorship: All authors are members of a working group that developed the content of this article over a 4‐d meeting. J. L. Williams and T. E. X. Miller organized the working group and drafted the manuscript. T. Usui prepared Appendix S2 and conducted the meta‐analysis; C. Weiss‐Lehman drafted Appendix S1 . All authors contributed edits in preparation for manuscript submission.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the Ecological Society of America

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • biological invasion
  • dispersal evolution
  • eco-evolutionary dynamics
  • life history evolution
  • range expansion

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