Eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury: Reproducible, quantitative, physiological models to impair skeletal muscle’s capacity to generate force

Jarrod A. Call, Dawn A. Lowe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle regeneration an experimental injury model is required. Advantages of eccentric contraction-induced injury are that it is a controllable, reproducible, and physiologically relevant model to cause muscle injury, with injury being defined as a loss of force generating capacity. While eccentric contractions can be incorporated into conscious animal study designs such as downhill treadmill running, electrophysiological approaches to elicit eccentric contractions and examine muscle contractility, for example before and after the injurious eccentric contractions, allows researchers to circumvent common issues in determining muscle function in a conscious animal (e.g., unwillingness to participate). Herein, we describe in vitro and in vivo methods that are reliable, repeatable, and truly maximal because the muscle contractions are evoked in a controlled, quantifiable manner independent of subject motivation. Both methods can be used to initiate eccentric contraction-induced injury and are suitable for monitoring functional muscle regeneration hours to days to weeks post-injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages3-18
Number of pages16
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1460
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Keywords

  • Force drop
  • Lengthening contraction
  • Muscle damage

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