Earth history and the passerine superradiation

Carl H. Oliveros, Daniel J. Field, Daniel T. Ksepka, F. Keith Barker, Alexandre Aleixo, Michael J. Andersen, Per Alström, Brett W. Benz, Edward L. Braun, Michael J. Braun, Gustavo A. Bravo, Robb T. Brumfield, R. Terry Chesser, Santiago Claramunt, Joel Cracraft, Andrés M. Cuervo, Elizabeth P. Derryberry, Travis C. Glenn, Michael G. Harvey, Peter A. HosnerLeo Joseph, Rebecca T. Kimball, Andrew L. Mack, Colin M. Miskelly, A. Townsend Peterson, Mark B. Robbins, Frederick H. Sheldon, Luís Fábio Silveira, Brian Tilston Smith, Noor D. White, Robert G. Moyle, Brant C. Faircloth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

135 Scopus citations

Abstract

Avian diversification has been influenced by global climate change, plate tectonic movements, and mass extinction events. However, the impact of these factors on the diversification of the hyperdiverse perching birds (passerines) is unclear because family level relationships are unresolved and the timing of splitting events among lineages is uncertain. We analyzed DNA data from 4,060 nuclear loci and 137 passerine families using concatenation and coalescent approaches to infer a comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis that clarifies relationships among all passerine families. Then, we calibrated this phylogeny using 13 fossils to examine the effects of different events in Earth history on the timing and rate of passerine diversification. Our analyses reconcile passerine diversification with the fossil and geological records; suggest that passerines originated on the Australian landmass ∼47 Ma; and show that subsequent dispersal and diversification of passerines was affected by a number of climatological and geological events, such as Oligocene glaciation and inundation of the New Zealand landmass. Although passerine diversification rates fluctuated throughout the Cenozoic, we find no link between the rate of passerine diversification and Cenozoic global temperature, and our analyses show that the increases in passerine diversification rate we observe are disconnected from the colonization of new continents. Taken together, these results suggest more complex mechanisms than temperature change or ecological opportunity have controlled macroscale patterns of passerine speciation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7916-7925
Number of pages10
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume116
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 16 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. We thank the curators, staff, and field collectors at the institutions listed in Dataset S1 for tissue samples used in this project; without their hard work, this study would not have been possible. We also thank Van Remsen for comments on earlier drafts, and we thank our three reviewers and the editor for their comments, which improved this manuscript. This study was supported by setup funds from Louisiana State University (to B.C.F.) and by funds from the National Science Foundation: Grant DEB-1655624 (to B.C.F. and R.T.B.), Grant DEB-1655736 (to B.T.S., D.T.K., and R.T.C.), Grants DEB-1655559 and DEB-1541312 (to F.K.B.), Grant DEB-1655683 (to R.T.K. and E.L.B.), Grants DEB-1241181 and DEB-1557053 (to R.G.M.), Grant DEB-1146265 (to R.T.B., A.A., R.T.C., and F.H.S.), Grant DEB-1241066 (to J.C.), and Grant DEB-1146423 (to E.P.D.). M.J.B., N.D.W., T.C.G., R.T.B., E.L.B., and B.C.F. were supported by grants from the Smithsonian Grand Challenges Consortia. G.A.B. and L.F.S. were supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (Grants 2012-23852-0 and 56378-0). L.F.S. and A.A. were supported by the Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas (Grants 302291/2015-6 and 306843/2016-1). P.A. was supported by the Swedish Research Foundation (Grant 2015-04402) and Jornvall Foundation. Portions of this research were conducted with high-performance computing resources provided by Louisiana State University (www.hpc.lsu.edu). Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

Funding Information:
We thank the curators, staff, and field collectors at the institutions listed in Dataset S1 for tissue samples used in this project; without their hard work, this study would not have been possible. We also thank Van Remsen for comments on earlier drafts, and we thank our three reviewers and the editor for their comments, which improved this manuscript. This study was supported by setup funds from Louisiana State University (to B.C.F.) and by funds from the National Science Foundation: Grant DEB-1655624 (to B.C.F. and R.T.B.), Grant DEB-1655736 (to B.T.S., D.T.K., and R.T.C.), Grants DEB-1655559 and DEB-1541312 (to F.K.B.), Grant DEB-1655683 (to R.T.K. and E.L.B.), Grants DEB-1241181 and DEB-1557053 (to R.G.M.), Grant DEB-1146265 (to R.T.B., A.A., R.T.C., and F.H.S.), Grant DEB-1241066 (to J.C.), and Grant DEB-1146423 (to E.P.D.). M.J.B., N.D.W., T.C.G., R.T.B., E.L.B., and B.C.F. were supported by grants from the Smithsonian Grand Challenges Consortia. G.A.B. and L.F.S. were supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (Grants 2012-23852-0 and 56378-0). L.F.S. and A.A. were supported by the Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas (Grants 302291/2015-6 and 306843/2016-1). P.A. was supported by the Swedish Research Foundation (Grant 2015-04402) and Jornvall Foundation. Portions of this research were conducted with high-performance computing resources provided by Louisiana State University (www.hpc.lsu.edu). Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Biogeography
  • Climate
  • Diversification
  • Macroevolution
  • Passeriformes

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