EARLY STAGES OF MINE SOIL GENESIS IN A SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA SPOIL LITHOSEQUENCE.

J. A. Roberts, W. L. Daniels, Jay Bell, J. A. Burger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Natural topsoils in the Appalachian surface mining region are often more difficult to use and less desirable than alternative spoil materials. Parent material effects and initial pedogenic changes over 3 yr were observed in 5 mixes of sandstone (SS) and siltstone (SiS) spoils under grass vegetation. Spoil type controlled initial soil texture, but significant decreases in sand contents and increases in silt contents occurred in several spoil mixes within 2 yr. All mine soils studied were high ( plus or minus 65%) in coarse fragments. Mine soils derived from spoils high in siltstone content were higher in coarse fragments, pH, extractable cations and iron, fine earth ( less than 2 mm) water holding capacity, and electrical conductivity than sandstone mine soils. Dissolution and leaching, oxidation, and organic matter incorporation were dominant pedogenic processes influencing mine soil properties over the period of this experiment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)716-723
Number of pages8
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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