Early detection of SARS-CoV-2 and other infections in solid organ transplant recipients and household members using wearable devices

Brendan J. Keating, Eyas H. Mukhtar, Eric D. Elftmann, Feyisope R. Eweje, Hui Gao, Lina I. Ibrahim, Ranganath G. Kathawate, Alexander C. Lee, Eric H. Li, Krista A. Moore, Nikhil Nair, Venkata Chaluvadi, Janaiya Reason, Francesca Zanoni, Alexander T. Honkala, Amein K. Al-Ali, Fatima Abdullah Alrubaish, Maha Ahmad Al-Mozaini, Fahad A. Al-Muhanna, Khaldoun Al-RomaihSamuel B. Goldfarb, Ryan Kellogg, Krzysztof Kiryluk, Sarah J. Kizilbash, Taisa J. Kohut, Juhi Kumar, Matthew J. O'Connor, Elizabeth B. Rand, Robert R. Redfield, Benjamin Rolnik, Joseph Rossano, Pablo G. Sanchez, Arash Alavi, Amir Bahmani, Gireesh K. Bogu, Andrew W. Brooks, Ahmed A. Metwally, Tejas Mishra, Stephen D. Marks, Robert A. Montgomery, Jay A. Fishman, Sandra Amaral, Pamala A. Jacobson, Meng Wang, Michael P. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The increasing global prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 and the resulting COVID-19 disease pandemic pose significant concerns for clinical management of solid organ transplant recipients (SOTR). Wearable devices that can measure physiologic changes in biometrics including heart rate, heart rate variability, body temperature, respiratory, activity (such as steps taken per day) and sleep patterns, and blood oxygen saturation show utility for the early detection of infection before clinical presentation of symptoms. Recent algorithms developed using preliminary wearable datasets show that SARS-CoV-2 is detectable before clinical symptoms in >80% of adults. Early detection of SARS-CoV-2, influenza, and other pathogens in SOTR, and their household members, could facilitate early interventions such as self-isolation and early clinical management of relevant infection(s). Ongoing studies testing the utility of wearable devices such as smartwatches for early detection of SARS-CoV-2 and other infections in the general population are reviewed here, along with the practical challenges to implementing these processes at scale in pediatric and adult SOTR, and their household members. The resources and logistics, including transplant-specific analyses pipelines to account for confounders such as polypharmacy and comorbidities, required in studies of pediatric and adult SOTR for the robust early detection of SARS-CoV-2, and other infections are also reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1019-1031
Number of pages13
JournalTransplant International
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Support for this work was received from The University of Pennsylvania (Penn) Transplant Institute; Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation; Department of Genetics, University of Stanford; Google for Education Academic Research; VIRTUUS Children's Study (R01HD091185); The Fred and Suzanne Biesecker Pediatric Liver Center at Children?s Hospital of Philadelphia; and The Philadelphia Gift of Life Organ Procurement Organization and The Stanford Flu Lab. King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) grant number 12-MED2799-46 for Amein K. Al-Ali, Fatima Abdullah Alrubaish, Fahad A. Al-Muhanna. UnitedHealthGroup R&D and Optum Labs.

Funding Information:
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) grant number 12‐MED2799‐46 for Amein K. Al‐Ali, Fatima Abdullah Alrubaish, Fahad A. Al‐Muhanna. UnitedHealthGroup R&D and Optum Labs.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT

Keywords

  • eHealth
  • mHealth
  • telemedicine
  • transplantation
  • wearables

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

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