Dynamic wetting failure in curtain coating: Comparison of model predictions and experimental observations

Chen Yu Liu, Marcio S. Carvalho, Satish Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this work dynamic wetting failure of Newtonian liquids in a curtain coating geometry is studied using a hydrodynamic model developed in our prior work (Liu et al., 2016b). The model is used to predict the onset of wetting failure with curtain heights consistent with prior experimental setups. In the model, a Navier-slip boundary condition and constant contact angle are used to describe the dynamic contact line (DCL). The governing equations are solved with the Galerkin finite-element method and the critical substrate speed is identified at which wetting failure occurs. A boundary of a coating window is constructed which outlines the critical substrate speed for different flow rates of the liquid curtain. The model predictions are compared with prior experimental observations reported by Blake et al. (1999) and Marston et al. (2009). The model reproduces the non-monotonic behavior of the critical speed as the liquid flow rate increases. When surfactants are absent, our results suggest that the experimental observations can largely be explained with a model that uses the simplest boundary conditions at the DCL (Navier-slip and constant contact angle) and accounts for the air stresses there to accurately calculate interface shapes. When surfactants are present, our results suggest that a decrease in the equilibrium surface tension may not be the only mechanism responsible for changes in the shape of the coating window. In particular, Marangoni stresses may play an important role.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-82
Number of pages9
JournalChemical Engineering Science
Volume195
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1434016 . C.-Y. L. acknowledges financial support from the Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship administered by the University of Minnesota . We are grateful to the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute (MSI) at the University of Minnesota for providing computational resources.

Funding Information:
This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1434016. C.-Y. L. acknowledges financial support from the Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship administered by the University of Minnesota. We are grateful to the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute (MSI) at the University of Minnesota for providing computational resources.

Keywords

  • Air entrainment
  • Curtain coating
  • Dynamic wetting failure
  • Surfactants

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