Dynamic imaging of ictal oscillations using non-invasive high-resolution EEG

Lin Yang, Christopher Wilke, Benjamin Brinkmann, Gregory A. Worrell, Bin He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scalp electroencephalography (EEG) has been established as a major component of the pre-surgical evaluation for epilepsy surgery. However, its ability to localize seizure onset zones (SOZ) has been significantly restricted by its low spatial resolution and indirect correlation with underlying brain activities. Here we report a novel non-invasive dynamic seizure imaging (DSI) approach based upon high-density EEG recordings. This novel approach was particularly designed to image the dynamic changes of ictal rhythmic discharges that evolve through time, space and frequency. This method was evaluated in a group of 8 epilepsy patients and results were rigorously validated using intracranial EEG (iEEG) (n = 3) and surgical outcome (n = 7). The DSI localized the ictal activity in concordance with surgically resected zones and ictal iEEG recordings in the cohort of patients. The present promising results support the ability to precisely and accurately image dynamic seizure activity from non-invasive measurements. The successful establishment of such a non-invasive seizure imaging modality for surgical evaluation will have a significant impact in the management of medically intractable epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1908-1917
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroImage
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by NIH RO1 EB007920 , RO1 EB006433 and NSF CBET-0933067 (B.H.). The authors would like to thank Cindy Nelson for technical assistance in data collection, and Dr. Gang Wang for assistance in data analysis.

Keywords

  • Dynamic seizure imaging
  • High-resolution EEG
  • Pre-surgical planning

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