Drag force on elements representative of vegetation in overland flow

A. M. Thompson, Bruce N Wilson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Information on surface shear stress for a given flow condition is necessary to quantify potential soil erosion. As water moves across a rough surface, part of the total force acts on the surface roughness and the remainder acts on the intervening soil surface. Vegetation acts to reduce surface shear stresses, thereby reducing erosion. Information on the drag force acting on individual vegetative elements is necessary for partitioning shear stress between the vegetation and the soil surface. A technique developed to measure the drag force on individual vegetative elements is presented. Vegetation elements are modeled in a hydraulic flume using circular cylinders and idealized shapes to account for variations in frontal area (both increasing and decreasing) with height. A range of flow depths and velocities is used to simulate overland flow conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering Solutions for a New Century
Pages2285-2300
Number of pages16
Volume2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Event2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century - Milwaukee, WI., United States
Duration: Jul 9 2000Jul 12 2000

Other

Other2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century
CountryUnited States
CityMilwaukee, WI.
Period7/9/007/12/00

Keywords

  • Drag
  • Erosion
  • Overland Flow
  • Shear Stress
  • Vegetation

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  • Cite this

    Thompson, A. M., & Wilson, B. N. (2000). Drag force on elements representative of vegetation in overland flow. In 2000 ASAE Annual International Meeting, Technical Papers: Engineering Solutions for a New Century (Vol. 2, pp. 2285-2300)