Dopamine D1 receptor gene expression decreases in the nucleus accumbens upon long-term exposure to palatable food and differs depending on diet-induced obesity phenotype in rats

J. Alsiö, P. K. Olszewski, A. H. Norbäck, Z. E.A. Gunnarsson, Allen S Levine, C. Pickering, H. B. Schiöth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

125 Scopus citations

Abstract

The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) mediates feeding reward; its activity reflects tastants' hedonic value. NAcc dopamine guides immediate responses to reward, however, its involvement in establishing long-term responses after a period of exposure to palatable foods has not been defined. Furthermore, reward-driven overeating propels weight increase, but the scale of weight gain depends on animals' obesity-prone (OP) or -resistant (OR) phenotype. It is unclear whether the NAcc dopamine response to palatable food depends on obesity susceptibility. We investigated the effect of unrestricted extended access to high-fat high-sugar (HFHS) diet on expression of genes encoding dopamine receptors in the NAcc of OP and OR rats. We examined persistence of HFHS diet-induced changes in D1 and D2 gene expression in OP and OR rats subjected to HFHS withdrawal (bland chow for 18 days). Effects of restricted access to HFHS by pair-feeding were also studied. Using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), we found that NAcc D1 mRNA was downregulated after long-term HFHS access in OP vs. OR animals. The effect was also observed after 18 days of HFHS withdrawal. Furthermore, restricted HFHS led to downregulation of D1 as well as of D2 mRNA levels compared to chow-fed controls. A difference in the expression of mu opioid receptor in the NAcc was also detected between the OP and OR rats during access to palatable food but not after withdrawal. We conclude that exposure to HFHS diets has lasting consequences for the NAcc dopamine system, perhaps modifying the motivation to search for food reward. The fact that the NAcc D1 expression changes in OP animals after long-term exposure to palatable food and that this effect extends well into the reward discontinuation phase, implicates the D1 receptor in the propensity to overeat and, in effect, gain weight in obesity prone individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-787
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience
Volume171
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The studies were supported by the Swedish Research Council (VR, medicine), AFA insurance , Svenska Läkaresällskapet , Åhlens Foundation , The Novo Nordisk Foundation , the Swedish Brain Research Foundation (Hjärnfonden) , and Systembolaget (SRA) . We thank Elin D. Almstedt for help with qPCR measurements. We thank Dr. Jonas Lindblom for valuable discussions. CP was supported by the Swedish Brain Research Foundation (Hjärnfonden) .

Keywords

  • Caudate putamen
  • Dietary fat
  • Dietary sugar
  • Obesity-prone phenotype
  • Opioid receptors

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