Donors with group B KIR haplotypes improve relapse-free survival after unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

Sarah A Cooley, Elizabeth Trachtenberg, Tracy L. Bergemann, Koy Saeteurn, John Klein, Chap T Le, Steven G.E. Marsh, Lisbeth A. Guethlein, Peter Parham, Jeffrey S Miller, Daniel J Weisdorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

316 Scopus citations

Abstract

Survival for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is limited by treatmentrelated mortality (TRM) and relapse after unrelated donor (URD) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Natural killer (NK)- cell alloreactivity, determined by donor killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and recipient HLA, correlates with successful HCT for AML. Hypothesizing that donor KIR genotype (A/A: 2 A KIR haplotypes; B/x: at least 1 B haplotype) would affect outcomes, we genotyped donors and recipients from 209 HLAmatched and 239 mismatched T-replete URD transplantations for AML. Threeyear overall survival was significantly higher after transplantation from a KIR B/x donor (31% [95% CI: 26-36] vs 20% [95% CI: 13-27]; (P=.007). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a 30% improvement in the relative risk of relapse-free survival with B/x donors compared with A/A donors (RR: 0.70 [95% CI: 0.55-0.88]; (P=.002). B/x donors were associated with a higher incidence of chronic graftversus- host disease (GVHD; RR: 1.51 [95% CI: 1.01-2.18]; (P =.03), but not of acute GVHD, relapse, or TRM. This analysis demonstrates that unrelated donors with KIR B haplotypes confer significant survival benefit to patients undergoing T-replete HCT for AML. KIR genotyping of prospective donors, in addition to HLA typing, should be performed to identify HLA-matched donors with B KIR haplotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)726-732
Number of pages7
JournalBlood
Volume113
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2009

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