Does weight status influence weight-related beliefs and the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and fast food purchases in adolescents?

Mary O. Hearst, Keryn E. Pasch, Jayne Fulkerson, Leslie A. Lytle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To determine if weight status affects the relationship between weight-related beliefs and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and fast and convenience store food purchases (FCFP). Design Observational, cross-sectional. Setting Twin Cities Metropolitan area, Minnesota, USA. Methods Body composition and psychosocial survey were obtained for 345 adolescents. General Linear Models tested adjusted (age and sex) associations between weight-related beliefs and consumption of SSB and FCFP. Significant associations were tested for moderation by weight status. Results SSB was positively related to perceptions that people worry too much about their weight (β = 0.103, p = 0.016), with no moderation present. FCFP were positively associated to perceived barriers to maintaining a healthy weight (β = 0.042, p = 0.004) with a subsequent significant interaction by weight status. Stratified models showed a significant association between perceived barriers to a healthy weight and FCFP for overweight adolescents (β = 0.345, p = 0.022). Conclusions Addressing perceived barriers to a healthy diet may lead to important risk reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-294
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Education Journal
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Fast food
  • Perceived barriers
  • Sugar-sweetened beverage
  • Weight status

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