Does tubal sterilization influence the subsequent risk of menorrhagia or dysmenorrhea?

Bernard L Harlow, Stacey A. Missmer, Daniel W. Cramer, Robert L. Barbieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the relation between tubal ligation, change in menstrual cycle characteristics, and early follicular phase hormones. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of women 36-44 years of age. Setting: The greater Boston area. Patient(s): Nine hundred seventy-six premenopausal women with intact uteri. Intervention(s): A comparison of women with and without a history of tubal ligation. Main Outcome Measure(s): Menstrual and reproductive histories were self-reported. Early follicular phase blood samples were obtained to assess FSH, LH, and E 2. We compared menstrual cycle changes from the first 5 years after menarche with completion of the baseline questionnaire in women with and without a prior history of tubal ligation. Result(s): Cycle length, cycle regularity, menses length, flow volume, dysmenorrhea, and hormone levels were similar in women with and without a history of tubal ligation. However, among parous women with a history of cesarean section, those with a tubal ligation >5 years ago experienced a marginal increase in volume of menstrual flow compared with women with no tubal ligation history. Conclusion(s): We found no significant change in menstrual cycle characteristics or hormone levels in women with or without a history of tubal ligation. However, tubal ligation may have a modest effect on the change in menstrual flow volume over time among parous women with a history of cesarean section.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)754-760
Number of pages7
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume77
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2002

Keywords

  • Cesarean section
  • Dysmenorrhea
  • Menorrhagia
  • Tubal ligation

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