Does pubertal stage mediate the association between family environment and structure and function of the amygdala-mPFC circuit? A replication study of the longitudinal ABCD cohort

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Abstract

Psychosocial acceleration theory suggests that early stress accelerates pubertal development. Using half of the baseline Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) cohort, Thijssen et al. (2020) provide support that accelerated puberty following stressful family environments may promote neurodevelopment. Here, we replicate and extend those analyses using 1) data from the second half of the ABCD sample (n = 3300 +, ages 9–10), and 2) longitudinal imaging data from the original sample (n = 1800 +, ages 11–12). A family environment latent variable was created and related to anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) thickness, area, white matter fractional anisotropy, amygdala volume, and cingulo-opercular network (CON)–amygdala resting-state functional connectivity. Results from the independent sample replicate the mediating effects of family environment through pubertal stage on amygdala-CON functional connectivity. Sex-stratified analyses show indirect effects via pubertal stage in girls; boys show evidence for direct associations. Analyses using wave 2 imaging data or wave 2-wave 1 difference scores from the originally-analyzed sample replicate the resting-state indirect effects. The current paper replicates the mediating role for puberty in the association between family environment and neurodevelopment. As both direct and indirect associations were found, puberty may be one of multiple mechanisms driving accelerated neurodevelopment following environmental stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101120
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume56
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data used in the preparation of this article were obtained from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development® (ABCD) Study ( https://abcdstudy.org ), held in the NIMH Data Archive (NDA). This is a multisite, longitudinal study designed to recruit more than 10,000 children age 9–10 and follow them over 10 years into early adulthood. The ABCD Study® is supported by the National Institutes of Health and additional federal partners under award numbers U01DA041048 , U01DA050989 , U01DA051016 , U01DA041022 , U01DA051018 , U01DA051037 , U01DA050987 , U01DA041174 , U01DA041106 , U01DA041117 , U01DA041028 , U01DA041134 , U01DA050988 , U01DA051039 , U01DA041156 , U01DA041025 , U01DA041120 , U01DA051038 , U01DA041148 , U01DA041093 , U01DA041089 , U24DA041123 , U24DA041147 . A full list of supporters is available at https://abcdstudy.org/federal-partners.html . A listing of participating sites and a complete listing of the study investigators can be found at https://abcdstudy.org/consortiummembers/ . ABCD consortium investigators designed and implemented the study and/or provided data but did not necessarily participate in analysis or writing of this report. This manuscript reflects the views of the authors and may not reflect the opinions or views of the NIH or ABCD consortium investigators. The ABCD data repository grows and changes over time. The ABCD data used in this report came from NDA Release 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0 (http://dx.doi.org/10.15154/1412097, http://dx.doi.org/10.15154/1503209, and http://dx.doi.org/10.15154/1519007).

Funding Information:
Data used in the preparation of this article were obtained from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development® (ABCD) Study (https://abcdstudy.org), held in the NIMH Data Archive (NDA). This is a multisite, longitudinal study designed to recruit more than 10,000 children age 9–10 and follow them over 10 years into early adulthood. The ABCD Study® is supported by the National Institutes of Health and additional federal partners under award numbers U01DA041048, U01DA050989, U01DA051016, U01DA041022, U01DA051018, U01DA051037, U01DA050987, U01DA041174, U01DA041106, U01DA041117, U01DA041028, U01DA041134, U01DA050988, U01DA051039, U01DA041156, U01DA041025, U01DA041120, U01DA051038, U01DA041148, U01DA041093, U01DA041089, U24DA041123, U24DA041147. A full list of supporters is available at https://abcdstudy.org/federal-partners.html. A listing of participating sites and a complete listing of the study investigators can be found at https://abcdstudy.org/consortiummembers/. ABCD consortium investigators designed and implemented the study and/or provided data but did not necessarily participate in analysis or writing of this report. This manuscript reflects the views of the authors and may not reflect the opinions or views of the NIH or ABCD consortium investigators. The ABCD data repository grows and changes over time. The ABCD data used in this report came from NDA Release 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0 (http://dx.doi.org/10.15154/1412097, http://dx.doi.org/10.15154/1503209, and http://dx.doi.org/10.15154/1519007).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

Keywords

  • accelerated development
  • amygdala
  • amygdala-mPFC
  • family environment
  • pubertal development

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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