Does primary tracheoesophageal puncture reduce complications after laryngectomy and improve patient communication?

Richard G. Karlen, Robert H. Maisel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The charts of 96 patients who had a laryngectomy at the University of Minnesota and affiliated hospitals were reviewed to assess the benefit of primary tracheoesophageal puncture (TEP). Patients were stratified into those with primary TEP and those without. There was no statistical difference in rates of esophageal stenosis, stomal stenosis, or wound breakdown without fistula. No fistulas developed in 33 patients who received primary TEP. 52% Of those with primary TEP, used their prosthesis for speech long-term. Only 5 of 63 patients whose surgery did not include primary TEP, received a secondary TEP, and only 2 retained the prosthesis for speech. There was no increased morbidity or incidence of complications after laryngectomy when performing a primary TEP. Patients will maintain the initial form of speech rehabilitation, even if it is less comprehensible. The early postoperative period is convenienced by using the puncture site as the entrance for nutrition during wound healing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-328
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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