Does prenatal stress alter the developing connectome?

Dustin Scheinost, Rajita Sinha, Sarah N. Cross, Soo Hyun Kwon, Gordon Sze, R. Todd Constable, Laura R. Ment

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human neurodevelopment requires the organization of neural elements into complex structural and functional networks called the connectome. Emerging data suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress plays a role in the wiring, or miswiring, of the developing connectome. Stress-related symptoms are common in women during pregnancy and are risk factors for neurobehavioral disorders ranging from autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction, to major depression and schizophrenia. This review focuses on structural and functional connectivity imaging to assess the impact of changes in women's stress-based physiology on the dynamic development of the human connectome in the fetal brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-226
Number of pages13
JournalPediatric Research
Volume81
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Gates Foundation OPP1119263, Seattle, WA, and National Institutes of Health T32 HD07094, Bethesda, MD.

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