Does clinical depression affect the accuracy of self-reported height and weight in obese women?

Robert W. Jeffery, Emily A. Finch, Jennifer A. Linde, Gregory E. Simon, Evette J. Ludman, Belinda H. Operskalski, Paul Rohde, Laura E. Ichikawa

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16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective:Recent research from a self-report survey showed a strong association between obesity and clinical depression in women. The present analysis assessed whether differential bias in self-reports of height and weight as a function of depression influences the apparent strength of the association.Methods:Accuracy of self-reported height and weight was assessed in 250 obese (mean BMI38.7 kg/m 2) women, 135 of whom met the American Psychiatric Association DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for clinical depression.Results:Depressed and non-depressed women underreported their weight by 1.5 and 1.2 kg, respectively. They underreported their height by 0.002 and 0.003 m, respectively.Discussion:Bias in self-reports of body weight and height is similar in depressed and non-depressed obese women. The underreporting of weight in both groups is similar in magnitude to that seen in normal weight women. Thus, using self-reports of height and weight seems unlikely to bias estimates of the association between obesity and clinical depression in women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-475
Number of pages3
JournalObesity
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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    Jeffery, R. W., Finch, E. A., Linde, J. A., Simon, G. E., Ludman, E. J., Operskalski, B. H., Rohde, P., & Ichikawa, L. E. (2008). Does clinical depression affect the accuracy of self-reported height and weight in obese women? Obesity, 16(2), 473-475. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.66