Does adherence to child care nutrition and physical activity best practices differ by child care provider's participation in support programs and training?

K. A. Loth, A. Shanafelt, C. S. Davey, J. O'Meara, J. Johnson-Reed, N. Larson, S. Nanney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: To date, gaps exist in our understanding of how child care provider participation in various support programs is associated with the reported implementation of nutrition and physical activity best practices by child care providers. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to compare implementation of nutrition and physical activity best practices among child care providers engaged in the Child and Adult Food Care Program (CACFP), Parent AWARE, and other training opportunities, to implementation among providers who do not participate in each of these opportunities. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of survey data collected from a stratified-random sample of licensed family-home and center-based child care settings (Family-homes n=394; Centers n= 224) in XXX from Month-Month 20XX. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression models were used to characterize differences in adherence to best practices based on program participation (CACFP, Parent AWARE, training) and type of child care setting (center versus family-home). Surveys measured self-reported engagement in nutrition and PA best practices as well as participation in CACFP, Parent Aware, and training opportunities. Results: Center-based child care providers participating in CACFP adhered to more nutrition and PA best practices than those not involved in CACFP. Further, with one exception, participating in Parent AWARE and engagement in training were positively associated with adherence to nutrition practices in center and family-home setting, and with adherence to PA practices in family homes. Conclusions: Child care providers should be encouraged to participate in available support programs; advocates should work to identify and remove barriers to support program participation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104417
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Child and Adult Care Food Program
  • Child care
  • Child care training
  • Nutrition best practices
  • Physical activity best practices
  • Quality rating improvement system

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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