Does a causal relation exist between the functional hemispheric asymmetries of visual processing subsystems?

David R. Andresen, Chad J. Marsolek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Past research indicates that specific shape recognition and spatial-relations encoding rely on subsystems that exhibit right-hemisphere advantages, whereas abstract shape recognition and spatial-relations encoding rely on subsystems that exhibit left-hemisphere advantages. Given these apparent regularities, we tested whether asymmetries in shape processing are causally related to asymmetries in spatial-relations processing. We examined performance in four tasks using the same stimuli with divided-visual-field presentations. Importantly, the asymmetry observed in any one task did not correlate with the asymmetries observed in the other tasks in ways predicted by extant theories. Asymmetries in shape processing and spatial-relations encoding may not be due to a common causal force influencing multiple subsystems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-144
Number of pages10
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

Keywords

  • Hemispheric asymmetry
  • Lateralization
  • Object recognition
  • Perception
  • Visual subsystems

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