Docosahexaenoic acid production of the marine microalga Isochrysis galbana cultivated on renewable substrates from food processing waste under CO2 enrichment

Hongli Zheng, Fengru Ge, Kunyan Song, Zixiang Yang, Jinmeng Li, Feng Yan, Xiaodan Wu, Qi Zhang, Yuhuan Liu, Roger Ruan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Leftover dough is a starch-rich food processing waste of Chinese steamed bread. Leftover dough hydrolysates enriched with glucose and amino acids were used to cultivate the marine microalga Isochrysis galbana to produce docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) under CO2 enrichment. Isochrysis galbana could use mixed carbon sources (CO2, glucose, and amino acids) synchronously to grow and accumulate DHA. Cell growth, the uptake of glucose and amino acids, and DHA production were significantly affected by CO2 enrichment. The maximum biomass concentration of 3.85 g L−1 was achieved with 3 % CO2. And the maximum DHA yield was 65.5 mg L−1 d−1. To enhance DHA production, a two-stage cultivation strategy was successfully developed by this work. The maximum DHA yield of the two-stage culture was elevated by 2.3-fold. It is feasible to produce DHA by Isochrysis galbana using leftover dough under CO2 enrichment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number157654
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume848
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21767017 and 22066016 ), and Science and Technology Project of Jiangxi Provincial Department of Science and Technology (Grant Nos. 20192BBH80023 and 20212BDH81004 ).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • CO enrichment
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Food processing waste
  • Leftover dough
  • Microalga
  • Renewable substrates

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Docosahexaenoic acid production of the marine microalga Isochrysis galbana cultivated on renewable substrates from food processing waste under CO2 enrichment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this