Do Type A men drink more frequently than Type B men? Findings in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT)

Aaron R. Folsom, John R. Hughes, Jan F. Buehler, Maurice B. Mittelmark, David R. Jacobs, Richard H. Grimm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The association between the Type A behavior pattern and self-reported alcohol intake was studied among men at high risk for coronary disease in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Two assessments of behavior pattern, the Structured Behavior Pattern Interview (SBPI) and the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS), and two measures of alcohol intake were examined. Type A's consumed more alcohol (up to 30% more) than Type B's. Type A's drank more frequently than Type B's rather than more alcohol per occasion. This association was consistent for both SBPI and JAS assessments of behavior pattern and was independent of age, income, smoking, and marital status. Increased drinking frequency appears to be a concomitant of the Type A behavior pattern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-235
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1985

Keywords

  • Type A pattern
  • alcohol
  • coronary disease
  • coronary-prone behavior

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