Do reductions in class size raise students' test scores? Evidence from population variation in Minnesota's elementary schools

Hyunkuk Cho, Paul W Glewwe, Melissa Whitler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many U.S. states and cities spend substantial funds to reduce class size, especially in elementary (primary) school. Estimating the impact of class size on learning is complicated, since children in small and large classes differ in many observed and unobserved ways. This paper uses a method of Hoxby (2000) to assess the impact of class size on the test scores of grade 3 and 5 students in Minnesota. The method exploits random variation in class size due to random variation in births in school and district catchment areas. The results show that reducing class size increases mathematics and reading test scores in Minnesota. Yet these impacts are very small; a decrease of ten students would increase test scores by only 0.04-0.05 standard deviations (of the distribution of test scores). Thus class size reductions are unlikely to lead to sizeable increases in student learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-95
Number of pages19
JournalEconomics of Education Review
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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elementary school
evidence
student
learning
primary school
school grade
mathematics
district
Test scores
Class size
school

Keywords

  • Class size
  • Elementary schools
  • Minnesota
  • Student learning
  • Test scores

Cite this

Do reductions in class size raise students' test scores? Evidence from population variation in Minnesota's elementary schools. / Cho, Hyunkuk; Glewwe, Paul W; Whitler, Melissa.

In: Economics of Education Review, Vol. 31, No. 3, 01.06.2012, p. 77-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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