Do Providers Know What They Do Not Know? A Correlational Study of Knowledge Acquisition and Person-Centered Care

Elizabeth B. Matthews, Victoria Stanhope, Mimi Choy-Brown, Meredith Doherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Person-centered care (PCC) is a central feature of health care reform, yet the tools needed to deliver this practice have not been implemented consistently. Person-centered care planning (PCCP) is a treatment planning approach operationalizing the values of recovery. To better understand PCCP implementation, this study examined the relationship between recovery knowledge and self-reported PCCP behaviors among 224 community mental health center staff. Results indicated that increased knowledge decreased the likelihood of endorsing non-recovery implementation barriers and self-reporting a high level of PCCP implementation. Findings suggest that individuals have difficulty assessing their performance, and point to the importance of objective fidelity measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-520
Number of pages7
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Implementation
  • Knowledge
  • Mental health services
  • Training

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