Do graft type or donor source affect acute rejection rates after liver transplant: A multivariate analysis

Thanh H.K. Nguyen, Keith Melancon, John Lake, William Payne, Abhinav Humar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We looked at acute rejection (AR) rates in adult liver transplant recipients to determine if graft type (whole liver vs. partial liver) or donor source (living vs. deceased donor) influenced the risk for AR. Between 1999 and 2005, we performed 292 whole liver transplants from a deceased donor (DD-WL) and 91 partial transplants, either from a living donor (LDLT, n = 59) or split liver from a deceased donor (DD-SL, n = 32). Pediatric recipients were not included. The groups were well matched by age and type of liver disease (p = ns), but mean model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were higher in the DD-WL vs. LD recipient groups (p < 0.01). Immunosuppression was similar for all. AR rates at 12months post-transplant were lower in the LDLT group (10.0%) vs. the DD-WL group (16.5%, p = 0.10), although this was not statistically significant. AR rates in the DD-SL transplant group (12.8%) were intermediate compared with the two other groups and not statistically different from either group (p=ns). By multivariate analysis, however, neither graft type (partial vs. whole) nor donor source (LD vs. DD) seemed to have an impact on the risk for AR. The only factor that was associated with an increased risk for AR was not using induction therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-629
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

Keywords

  • Acute rejection
  • Multivariate analysis
  • Partial graft

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Do graft type or donor source affect acute rejection rates after liver transplant: A multivariate analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this