Do Cultural and Generational Cohorts Matter to Ideologies and Consumer Ethics? A Comparative Study of Australians, Indonesians, and Indonesian Migrants in Australia

Andre A. Pekerti, Denni Arli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

We explore the notion that culture influences people’s values, and their subsequent ideologies and ethical behaviors. We present the idea that culture itself changes with time, and explore the influence of culture and generational markers on consumer ethics by examining differences in these ethical dimensions between Australians, Indonesians, and Indonesian Migrants in Australia, as well as differences between Generation X versus Generations Y and Z. The present study addresses the need to investigate the role that culture plays in consumer ethics, and the interaction between culture and generational attitudes in determining consumer ethics. Results established a distinct multiculturality in our three culturalsamples, including a generational cohort differences. This suggests that culture and generational markers influence ethical beliefs, ideologies, and consumer ethics. It further indicates that Indonesian Migrants have acculturated to Australian society both in terms of their values and consumer behaviors, illustrating a crossvergence effect; scores indicate that these Migrants have the highest cultural intelligence among our samples. Implications of the findings for consumer ethics theory and practice are considered and future directions identified.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-404
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume143
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Consumer ethics
  • Cultural intelligence
  • Ethical Ideology
  • Indonesia

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