Do children's executive functions account for associations between early autonomy-supportive parenting and achievement through high school?

Samantha W. Bindman, Eva M. Pomerantz, Glenn I. Roisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluated whether the positive association between early autonomy-supportive parenting and children's subsequent achievement is mediated by children's executive functions. Using observations of mothers' parenting from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 1,306), analyses revealed that mothers' autonomy support over the first 3 years of life predicted enhanced executive functions (i.e., inhibition, delay of gratification, and sustained attention) during the year before kindergarten and academic achievement in elementary and high school even when mothers' warmth and cognitive stimulation, as well as other factors (e.g., children's early general cognitive skills and mothers' educational attainment) were covaried. Mediation analyses demonstrated that over and above other attributes (e.g., temperament), children's executive functions partially accounted for the association between early autonomy-supportive parenting and children's subsequent achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)756-770
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume107
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 American Psychological Association.

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • Autonomy support
  • Executive functions
  • Parenting
  • Self-regulation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Do children's executive functions account for associations between early autonomy-supportive parenting and achievement through high school?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this