Do changes in neighborhood social context mediate the effects of the moving to opportunity experiment on adolescent mental health?

Nicole M. Schmidt, Quynh C. Nguyen, Rebecca Kehm, Theresa L. Osypuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated whether changes in neighborhood context induced by neighborhood relocation mediated the impact of the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) housing voucher experiment on adolescent mental health. Mediators included participant-reported neighborhood safety, social control, disorder, and externally-collected neighborhood collective efficacy. For treatment group members, improvement in neighborhood disorder and drug activity partially explained MTO's beneficial effects on girls' distress. Improvement in neighborhood disorder, violent victimization, and informal social control helped counteract MTO's adverse effects on boys' behavioral problems, but not distress. Housing mobility policy targeting neighborhood improvements may improve mental health for adolescent girls, and mitigate harmful effects for boys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102331
JournalHealth and Place
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by NIH grants 1R01MD006064-01 and 1R21HD066312-01 (Dr. Osypuk, PI). Funders did not have any role in design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development reviewed the manuscript to ensure respondent confidentiality was maintained in the presentation of results. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Minnesota Population Center (P2C HD041023) funded through a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Funding Information:
This work was supported by NIH grants 1R01MD006064-01 and 1R21HD066312-01 (Dr. Osypuk, PI). Funders did not have any role in design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development reviewed the manuscript to ensure respondent confidentiality was maintained in the presentation of results. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Minnesota Population Center ( P2C HD041023 ) funded through a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Housing policy
  • Mediation
  • Mental health
  • Neighborhood effects

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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