Diversity in Political Institutions and Congressional Responsiveness to Minority Interests

Michael D. Minta, Valeria Sinclair-Chapman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite claims that diversity benefits the democratic process, critics question whether increased diversity significantly improves government responsiveness and accountability beyond electoral competition and constituency influence. The authors advance a diversity infrastructure theory to explain why and how minority legislators have kept minority interests on the congressional agenda. Using data on congressional hearings held on civil rights and social welfare from 1951 to 2004, the authors find that despite the decline of national attention to civil rights and social welfare issues in general, increased diversity in the House and to a lesser extent in the Senate is responsible for keeping minority interests on the congressional agenda.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-140
Number of pages14
JournalPolitical Research Quarterly
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Keywords

  • Congress
  • civil rights
  • diversity
  • minority
  • representation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Diversity in Political Institutions and Congressional Responsiveness to Minority Interests'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this