Distressed and looking for help: Internet intervention support for arthritis self-management

Kiana R Johnson, Erika Fuchs, Keith J Horvath, Peter B Scal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Focusing on youth with juvenile arthritis (JA), this study investigates eHealth interventions as a means to develop services to improve the health of youth with chronic conditions. Internet use and preferences for Internet-based interventions were compared among youth with high and low psychosocial quality of life (PS-QL) scores. Methods Youth with JA (n = 134; high PS-QL, n = 67; low PS-QL, n = 67) completed the MyRheum online survey, which assessed physical functioning, psychosocial health, Internet usage, and amount of time spent using social networking Web sites. Youth indicated their choice, interest, and preferences in using a Web site for youth with JA. The t tests, chi-squared tests, and Fisher exact tests were used to assess significance between high and low PS-QL groups. Results Youth with lower PS-QL reported greater intrusiveness of their condition across life's activities than did youth with higher PS-QL. Low PS-QL was associated with spending more than 1 hour per day using social networking sites and having used the Internet to find information on various health and substance use topics. Youth with lower PS-QL expressed more interest in messaging others, online forums, building personal profiles, and networking with other teens than did youth with higher PS-QL. Both those with high and low PS-QL preferred online to in-person support groups. Conclusions Many youth with JA report low PS-QL and identify interest in Internet-based supportive interventions. The next generation of eHealth interventions for youth with JA, and possibly other chronic conditions, may better address their needs by recognizing the diversity of experiences and tailoring intervention strategies accordingly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)666-671
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

Self Care
Internet
Arthritis
Quality of Life
Juvenile Arthritis
Social Networking
Telemedicine
Health
Self-Help Groups

Keywords

  • E-health
  • Internet interventions
  • Juvenile arthritis
  • Juvenile rheumatic condition
  • Self-management

Cite this

Distressed and looking for help : Internet intervention support for arthritis self-management. / Johnson, Kiana R; Fuchs, Erika; Horvath, Keith J; Scal, Peter B.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 56, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 666-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, Kiana R ; Fuchs, Erika ; Horvath, Keith J ; Scal, Peter B. / Distressed and looking for help : Internet intervention support for arthritis self-management. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2015 ; Vol. 56, No. 6. pp. 666-671.
@article{3952819338d34627bc3b3f3f566c0eae,
title = "Distressed and looking for help: Internet intervention support for arthritis self-management",
abstract = "Purpose Focusing on youth with juvenile arthritis (JA), this study investigates eHealth interventions as a means to develop services to improve the health of youth with chronic conditions. Internet use and preferences for Internet-based interventions were compared among youth with high and low psychosocial quality of life (PS-QL) scores. Methods Youth with JA (n = 134; high PS-QL, n = 67; low PS-QL, n = 67) completed the MyRheum online survey, which assessed physical functioning, psychosocial health, Internet usage, and amount of time spent using social networking Web sites. Youth indicated their choice, interest, and preferences in using a Web site for youth with JA. The t tests, chi-squared tests, and Fisher exact tests were used to assess significance between high and low PS-QL groups. Results Youth with lower PS-QL reported greater intrusiveness of their condition across life's activities than did youth with higher PS-QL. Low PS-QL was associated with spending more than 1 hour per day using social networking sites and having used the Internet to find information on various health and substance use topics. Youth with lower PS-QL expressed more interest in messaging others, online forums, building personal profiles, and networking with other teens than did youth with higher PS-QL. Both those with high and low PS-QL preferred online to in-person support groups. Conclusions Many youth with JA report low PS-QL and identify interest in Internet-based supportive interventions. The next generation of eHealth interventions for youth with JA, and possibly other chronic conditions, may better address their needs by recognizing the diversity of experiences and tailoring intervention strategies accordingly.",
keywords = "E-health, Internet interventions, Juvenile arthritis, Juvenile rheumatic condition, Self-management",
author = "Johnson, {Kiana R} and Erika Fuchs and Horvath, {Keith J} and Scal, {Peter B}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.02.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "56",
pages = "666--671",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distressed and looking for help

T2 - Internet intervention support for arthritis self-management

AU - Johnson, Kiana R

AU - Fuchs, Erika

AU - Horvath, Keith J

AU - Scal, Peter B

PY - 2015/6/1

Y1 - 2015/6/1

N2 - Purpose Focusing on youth with juvenile arthritis (JA), this study investigates eHealth interventions as a means to develop services to improve the health of youth with chronic conditions. Internet use and preferences for Internet-based interventions were compared among youth with high and low psychosocial quality of life (PS-QL) scores. Methods Youth with JA (n = 134; high PS-QL, n = 67; low PS-QL, n = 67) completed the MyRheum online survey, which assessed physical functioning, psychosocial health, Internet usage, and amount of time spent using social networking Web sites. Youth indicated their choice, interest, and preferences in using a Web site for youth with JA. The t tests, chi-squared tests, and Fisher exact tests were used to assess significance between high and low PS-QL groups. Results Youth with lower PS-QL reported greater intrusiveness of their condition across life's activities than did youth with higher PS-QL. Low PS-QL was associated with spending more than 1 hour per day using social networking sites and having used the Internet to find information on various health and substance use topics. Youth with lower PS-QL expressed more interest in messaging others, online forums, building personal profiles, and networking with other teens than did youth with higher PS-QL. Both those with high and low PS-QL preferred online to in-person support groups. Conclusions Many youth with JA report low PS-QL and identify interest in Internet-based supportive interventions. The next generation of eHealth interventions for youth with JA, and possibly other chronic conditions, may better address their needs by recognizing the diversity of experiences and tailoring intervention strategies accordingly.

AB - Purpose Focusing on youth with juvenile arthritis (JA), this study investigates eHealth interventions as a means to develop services to improve the health of youth with chronic conditions. Internet use and preferences for Internet-based interventions were compared among youth with high and low psychosocial quality of life (PS-QL) scores. Methods Youth with JA (n = 134; high PS-QL, n = 67; low PS-QL, n = 67) completed the MyRheum online survey, which assessed physical functioning, psychosocial health, Internet usage, and amount of time spent using social networking Web sites. Youth indicated their choice, interest, and preferences in using a Web site for youth with JA. The t tests, chi-squared tests, and Fisher exact tests were used to assess significance between high and low PS-QL groups. Results Youth with lower PS-QL reported greater intrusiveness of their condition across life's activities than did youth with higher PS-QL. Low PS-QL was associated with spending more than 1 hour per day using social networking sites and having used the Internet to find information on various health and substance use topics. Youth with lower PS-QL expressed more interest in messaging others, online forums, building personal profiles, and networking with other teens than did youth with higher PS-QL. Both those with high and low PS-QL preferred online to in-person support groups. Conclusions Many youth with JA report low PS-QL and identify interest in Internet-based supportive interventions. The next generation of eHealth interventions for youth with JA, and possibly other chronic conditions, may better address their needs by recognizing the diversity of experiences and tailoring intervention strategies accordingly.

KW - E-health

KW - Internet interventions

KW - Juvenile arthritis

KW - Juvenile rheumatic condition

KW - Self-management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930337579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930337579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.02.019

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.02.019

M3 - Article

C2 - 26003583

AN - SCOPUS:84930337579

VL - 56

SP - 666

EP - 671

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 6

ER -