Distal effects of tracheal gas insufflation: Changes with catheter position and oleic acid lung injury

Avi Nahum, Sue A. Ravenscraft, Alexander B. Adams, John J. Marini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

We separated distal (turbulence-related) and proximal (dead space washout-related) effects of tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) by comparing the effects of straight and inverted catheters. We reasoned that the inverted catheter was unlikely to remove CO2 from conducting airways distal to its orifice. In six normal dogs during TGI at 10 l/min, advancing the catheters from 10 to 1 cm above the main carina decreased dead space volume by 29 ± 12 and 12 ± 6 ml (P < 0.04) with the straight and inverted catheters, respectively. By comparison, the tracheal volume between 10 and 1 cm above the carina was 15 ± 2 ml. In another set of dogs (n = 5), we examined the distal effects of TGI before and after oleic acid-induced lung injury. During TGI at 10 l/min before and after oleic acid injury, the differences in arterial PCO2 between the straight and inverted catheters were 5 ± 1 and 9 ± 6 Torr (P < 0.18), respectively. Our data suggest that distal effects of TGI become more pronounced as the catheter tip is positioned closer to the main carina. The distal effects of TGI were not diminished after oleic acid injury when minute ventilation was maintained constant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1121-1127
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1996

Keywords

  • gas exchange
  • mechanical ventilation
  • turbulence

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