Disrupted circadian rhythms of body temperature, heart rate and fasting blood glucose in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus

D. G. Gubin, A. A. Nelaeva, A. E. Uzhakova, Y. V. Hasanova, G. Cornelissen, D. Weinert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report a progressive disruption of 24-h rhythms in fasting blood glucose (FBG), body temperature (BT) and heart rate (HR) associated with metabolic dysfunction and the development of prediabetes (PD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in overweight middle-aged (40–69 years old) humans. Increasing BT and HR mean values and declining 24-h BT and HR amplitudes accompany adverse changes in metabolic state. Increased nocturnal BT and a phase delay of the 24-h BT rhythm, deviant 24-h HR profile and a phase advance of the 24-h HR and FBG rhythms are early signs of the PD metabolic state. In T2DM, the 24-h FBG rhythm is no longer detectable, and the 24-h amplitudes of BT and HR are greatly diminished. In addition, lepton and creatinine values were lowered in T2DM. Moreover, positive correlations between FBG and body mass index, BMI, and negative correlations between the 24-h amplitude of FBG and BMI indicate that overweight is an additional factor causing disruption of the circadian rhythms. Further studies on circadian disruption as a consequence of metabolic dysfunction are necessary. The quantitative analysis of changing circadian BT and HR rhythms may provide prognostic markers of T2DM and therapeutic targets for its prevention and correction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1136-1148
Number of pages13
JournalChronobiology international
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 14 2017

Keywords

  • 24-h (circadian) rhythms
  • Body temperature
  • body mass index
  • circadian disruption
  • fasting blood glucose
  • heart rate
  • metabolic state
  • prediabetes
  • type 2 diabetes mellitus

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