Direct-to-consumer advertising skepticism and the use and perceived usefulness of prescription drug information sources

Denise E. Delorme, Jisu Huh, Leonard N. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates advertising skepticism in the context of consumers' prescription drug information seeking behavior. Results of a telephone survey found that: (a) the overall level of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) skepticism among consumers was neutral; (b) DTCA skepticism was unrelated to age, positively related to education and income, and varied by race; (c) however, when all the antecedent variables were considered concurrently, only education emerged as a significant predictor (consumers with higher education were more skeptical of DTCA); (d) DTCA skepticism was not significantly related to perceived importance of prescription drug information; (e) DTCA skepticism was not associated with use of advertising and interpersonal sources of prescription drug information; and (f) DTCA skepticism was negatively related to perceived usefulness of advertising sources but unrelated to perceived usefulness of professional interpersonal sources (i.e., physicians and pharmacists). The article concludes with a discussion of findings and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-314
Number of pages22
JournalHealth Marketing Quarterly
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

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Prescription Drugs
Education
Information Seeking Behavior
Drug-Seeking Behavior
Pharmacists
Telephone
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising
Perceived usefulness
Skepticism
Prescription drugs
Information sources
Direct-to-consumer advertising
Physicians

Keywords

  • Advertising skepticism
  • Consumer health decision-making
  • Consumer health information seeking behavior
  • DTC prescription drug advertising

Cite this

Direct-to-consumer advertising skepticism and the use and perceived usefulness of prescription drug information sources. / Delorme, Denise E.; Huh, Jisu; Reid, Leonard N.

In: Health Marketing Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.10.2009, p. 293-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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