Direct numerical simulation of transient growth on a flat plate at Mach 3

Ross Wagnild, Graham V. Candler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The transient growth phenomenon in three dimensional shear flows has been shown to account for large disturbance growth in cases where traditional stability analyses show limited or no growth. For this reason, transient growth has been put forward as a potential cause of bypass transition. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the presence of non-linear effects as the energy of disturbances increases and their potential role in boundary layer transition on a flat plate in supersonic, compressible flow. An optimal disturbance solver based on linear theory was created and is validated against previously published data. The disturbances generated by this solver are input into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver to model the disturbance evolution in three dimensions. The results from the CFD solver are compared with linear theory to ensure accuracy in the full three-dimensional simulations. Finally, the input energies are increased to investigate the effects of non-linear terms in the governing equations. Results show that a non-dimensional input energy of Ein = 3.024. 10-3 is required for a departure from linear behavior for the mean flow conditions considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication41st AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc.
ISBN (Print)9781600869471
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event41st AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit 2011 - Honolulu, HI, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2011Jun 30 2011

Publication series

Name41st AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit

Conference

Conference41st AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit 2011
CountryUnited States
CityHonolulu, HI
Period6/27/116/30/11

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Direct numerical simulation of transient growth on a flat plate at Mach 3'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this