Differential role of afferent and efferent renal nerves in the maintenance of early- and late-phase dahl S hypertension

Jason D. Foss, Gregory D. Fink, John W. Osborn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinical data suggest that renal denervation (RDNX) may be an effective treatment for human hypertension; however, it is unclear whether this therapeutic effect is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. We have previously shown that RDNX lowers arterial pressure in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rats to a similar degree observed in clinical trials. In addition, we have recently developed a method for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves (renal-CAP). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the antihypertensive effect of RDNX in the Dahl S rat is due to ablation of afferent renal nerves by comparing the effect of complete RDNX to renal-CAP during two phases of hypertension in the Dahl S rat. In the early phase, rats underwent treatment after 3 wk of high-NaCl feeding when mean arterial pressure (MAP) was ~140 mmHg. In the late phase, rats underwent treatment after 9 wk of high NaCl feeding, when MAP was ~170 mmHg. RDNX reduced MAP ~10 mmHg compared with sham surgery in both the early and late phase, whereas renal-CAP had no antihypertensive effect. These results suggest that, in the Dahl S rat, the antihypertensive effect of RDNX is not dependent on pretreatment arterial pressure, nor is it due to ablation of afferent renal nerves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R262-R267
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume310
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 the American Physiological Society.

Keywords

  • Afferent renal nerves
  • Dahl salt-sensitive rat
  • Efferent renal nerves
  • Renal denervation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differential role of afferent and efferent renal nerves in the maintenance of early- and late-phase dahl S hypertension'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this