Differential impact of egg predation by Zetzellia mail (Acari: Stigmaeidae) on Metaseiulus occidentalis and Typhlodromus pyri (Acari: Phytoseiidae)

I. V. MacRae, B. A. Croft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

The differential impact of Zetzellia mail on the phytoseiids Metaseiulus occidentalis and Typhlodromus pyri was studied in the laboratory and by analysis of population data from orchard plots that contained either phytoseiid, similar numbers of prey mites and high or low densities of Z. mali. Five hypotheses were evaluated to explain why Z. mali had more impact on M. occidentales in the field than on T. pyri. Given equal opportunity, Z. mali adult females did not consume more M. occidentalis eggs than T. pyri eggs nor did adult females of either phytoseiid inflict greater mortality on Z. mali eggs or larvae through attack or consumption. There was no difference in the within-tree association of Z. mali adult females with eggs of either phytoseiid species nor were there differences in the way prey mites (all life stages) were spatially partitioned between adult female Z. mali as compared with adults and deutonymphs (combined) of either phytoseiid. The foraging area of adult female Z. mali and the oviposition locations of the two phytoseiids from both field and laboratory data were compared using spatial statistics. Metaseiulus occidentalis laid significantly more eggs in the primary foraging area of adult female Z. mali than T. pyri. This was the only factor identified which may explain the greater impact of Z. mali on M. occidentalis. The impact of these interspecific effects on the persistence of predatory mite guilds and biological control are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-154
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental and Applied Acarology
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • Biological control
  • Interspecific competition
  • Spatial distributions

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