Dieting Status and Its Relationship to Weight, Dietary Intake, and Physical Activity Changes Over Two Years in a Working Population

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17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study prospectively examined changes in dietary intake, physical activity and weight associated with self‐reported efforts to lose weight in a cohort of 3671 men and women sampled from the general population. Dieting efforts, dietary intake, physical activity and weight were measured at two points in time, 24 months apart. At baseline, current dieters reported consuming fewer dairy products, sweets, meat, soft drinks and fried potatoes (all p's < .0001), and engaging more frequently in high‐intensity physical activity (p < .0001) than those not currently dieting. At follow‐up, current dieters reported consuming fewer sweets (p < .0001) and fried potatoes (p < .0008), and engaging more frequently in moderate‐intensity physical activity (p < .02) than those not currently dieting. Prospectively, those who initiated weight‐loss diets showed the largest decrease in consumption of sweets (p < .0001), soft drinks (p < .0001), and fried potatoes (p < .01), and increase in frequency of high‐intensity physical activity (p < .0001) and moderate‐intensity physical activity (p < .007). Those initiating weight‐loss diets were the only group to lose weight (1 lb.). Those dieting at baseline but not at follow‐up gained the most weight (4 lbs.). Self‐reports of current dieting correspond to reported changes in dietary intake and physical activity, and to measured changes in weight over the same time period. Individuals who report dieting to lose weight have healthier eating and exercise patterns than those who do not report dieting. 1994 North American Association for the Study of Obesity (NAASO)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-144
Number of pages10
JournalObesity research
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1994

Keywords

  • dietary intake
  • dieting
  • physical activity
  • weight loss

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