Dietary linolenic acid and fasting glucose and insulin: The national heart, lung, and blood institute family heart study

Luc Djoussé, Steven C. Hunt, Tang Weihong, John H. Eckfeldt, Michael A. Province, R. Curtis Ellison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess whether dietary linolenic acid is associated with fasting insulin and glucose. Research Methods and Procedures: In a cross-sectional design, we studied 3993 non-diabetic participants of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study 25 to 93 years of age. Linolenic acid was assessed through a food frequency questionnaire, and laboratory data were obtained after at least a 12-hour fast. We used generalized linear models to calculate adjusted means of insulin and glucose across quartiles of dietary linolenic acid. Results: From the lowest to the highest sex-specific quartile of dietary linolenic acid, means ± standard error for logarithmic transformed fasting insulin were 4.06 ± 0.02 (reference), 4.09 ± 0.02, 4.13 ± 0.02, and 4.17 ± 0.02 pM, respectively (trend, p < 0.0001), after adjustment for age, sex, energy intake, waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. When dietary linolenic acid was used as a continuous variable, the multivariable adjusted regression coefficient was 0.42 ± 0.08. There was no association between dietary linolenic acid and fasting glucose (trend p = 0.82). Discussion: Our data suggest that higher consumption of dietary linolenic acid is associated with higher plasma insulin, but not glucose levels, in non-diabetic subjects. Additional studies are needed to assess whether higher intake of linolenic acid results in an increased insulin secretion and improved glucose use in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-300
Number of pages6
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • Insulin
  • Linolenic acid
  • N-3 fatty acids

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