Diet, activity, and lifestyle associations with p53 mutations in colon tumors

Martha L. Slattery, Karen Curtin, K. Ma, Sandra Edwards, Donna Schaffer, Kristen Anderson, Wade Samowitz

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74 Scopus citations

Abstract

Inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is a common event in the development of colon cancer. We use data collected as part of a multicenter case-control study of colon cancer to evaluate associations between p53 mutations and diet and lifestyle factors. p53 mutational status was determined for 1458 incident cases of colon cancer using single-strand conformational polymorphism/sequencing of exons 5-8. We determined associations among those with and without mutations compared with population-based controls (N = 2410) and to cases with p53 mutations compared with cases without p53 mutations. Associations also were examined by location and function of specific types of p53 mutations. p53 mutations were identified in tumors in 47.1% of cases; 81.9% of people with mutations had a missense mutation. Cases with a p53 mutation were more likely to consume a Western-style diet, compared with controls [odds ratio (OR), 2.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.53-2.69], than were cases who were p53 wild type (Wt), compared with controls (OR, 1.57;95% CI, 1.20 -2.06). Specific components of the Western-style diet, including diets with a high glycemic load (mutation versus control: OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.11-1.98 and Wt versus control: OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.75-1.28) and diets high in red meat, fast food, and trans-fatty acid (mutation versus control: OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.47-2.50 and Wt versus control: OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.08-1.80) appeared to be most strongly associated with p53 mutations. Diets with a high glycemic load (relative to lowest intake) were significantly associated with missense mutations (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.23-2.33 comparing p53+ to controls and OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.19-2.50 comparing cases p53+ to cases p53 Wt), as were diets high in red meat, fast food, and trans-fatty acids (OR, 1.92; 95% C1, 1.14-2.56 comparing p53+ to controls and OR, 1.40; 95% C1, 1.00-1.98 comparing cases p53+ to cases p53 Wt). Physical inactivity, large body mass index, cigarette smoking, using aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and other dietary factors appeared to be comparably associated with colon cancer in those with and without p53 mutations. These data suggest that components of a Western-style diet such as high consumption of red meat and foods that increase glycemic load are associated with a p53 disease pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-548
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume11
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2002

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