Did socioeconomic inequalities in morbidity and mortality change in the United States over the course of the twentieth century?

John Robert Warren, Elaine M. Hernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this article we present two sets of empirical analyses that consider the extent to which socioeconomic gradients in self-assessed health and child mortality changed since the beginning of the twentieth century in the United States. This empirical issue has important and wide-ranging research and policy implications. In particular, our results speak to the value of considering the role of broader social, economic, and political inequalities in generating and maintaining socioeconomic disparities in morbidity and mortality. Despite dramatic declines in morbidity and mortality rates in the United States across the twentieth century, we find that socioeconomic-status gradients in morbidity and mortality declined only modestly (if at all) during that period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-351
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of health and social behavior
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

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