Diagnosing the locus of trust

A temporal perspective for trustor, trustee, and dyadic influences on perceived trustworthiness

Stephen L. Jones, Pri P Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extant trust research champions 3 different centers of action that determine perceptions of trust: The trustor (the individual rendering trust judgments), the trustee (the party being trusted), and the trustortrustee dyad. We refer to the centers of action as loci of trust. Thus far, researchers have investigated determinants residing within each locus independently but have not concurrently investigated all 3 loci. Thus, the relative influence of each locus on perceptions of trust is unknown. Nor is it known how the influence of each locus changes with time. Where is the dominant locus of trust? And how does it change over time? We address these questions by examining the influence of trustors, trustees, and dyads on perceived ability, benevolence, and integrity. We find that trustor influence decreases over time while trustee and dyadic influences increase. We also find that the trustor is the dominant locus for perceived ability, benevolence, and integrity initially, but over time the trustee becomes the dominant locus for perceived ability and integrity. For perceived benevolence, the trustor remains the dominant driver over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-414
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume101
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Keywords

  • Interpersonal trust
  • Multilevel analysis
  • Perceived trustworthiness
  • Social relations model

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Diagnosing the locus of trust : A temporal perspective for trustor, trustee, and dyadic influences on perceived trustworthiness. / Jones, Stephen L.; Shah, Pri P.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 101, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 392-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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