Development of a genetic system for the archaeal virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV)

Jennifer Fulton Wirth, Jamie C. Snyder, Rebecca A. Hochstein, Alice C. Ortmann, Deborah A. Willits, Trevor Douglas, Mark J. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our understanding of archaeal viruses has been limited by the lack of genetic systems for examining viral function. We describe the construction of an infectious clone for the archaeal virus Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV). STIV was isolated from a high temperature (82. °C) acidic (pH 2.2) hot spring in Yellowstone National Park and replicates in the archaeal model organism Sulfolobus solfataricus (Rice et al., 2004). While STIV is one of most studied archaeal viruses, little is known about its replication cycle. The development of an STIV infectious clone allows for directed gene disruptions and detailed genetic analysis of the virus. The utility of the STIV infectious clone was demonstrated by gene disruption of STIV open reading frame (ORF) B116 which resulted in crippled virus replication, while disruption of ORFs A197, C381 and B345 was lethal for virus replication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-11
Number of pages6
JournalVirology
Volume415
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation grant EF-0802200 and the National Aeronautics Space Administration grant number NNA-08CN85A .

Keywords

  • Archaea
  • Gene disruption
  • Infectious clone
  • Sulfolobus solfataricus
  • Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV)
  • Yellowstone National Park

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