Development and assessment of a prenatal cytomegalovirus (Cmv) educational survey: Implementation and impact in a metropolitan university-based clinic

Malinda R. Schaefer, Jessica Holttum, Megan Olson, Danielle Westenberg, Nathan Rubin, Mark R. Schleiss, Jessica Nyholm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Congenital CMV infection can result in serious sequelae in the newborn. The goal of this study was to assess pregnant women’s knowledge and understanding of CMV infection during pregnancy and develop an educational tool about CMV infection to be utilized during prenatal care. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective intervention study that assessed pregnant women’s knowledge before and after receiving an educational handout about CMV infection in pregnancy and the perceived value of this education. Pre-and post-education questionnaires were utilized to assess knowledge. The pre-education questionnaire and CMV educational handout were given at the same clinic visit. The educational handout was given after the pre-education questionnaire had been completed. The post-education questionnaire was given at the next scheduled prenatal clinic appointment and included questions regarding the level of satisfaction with the education and the perceived value of the information. Pregnant women less than 34 weeks of gestation were eligible. Results: A total of 263 women were enrolled, 263 completed the pre-CMV educational questionnaire and 215 women completed both questionnaires. Some women only partially completed the questionnaires and those partial responses have been included. Prior to education, 33% (85/261) of participants had heard of CMV. This increased to 75% (160/214) after education. Participants scored each of the recommended hygiene practices between 1 and 5 (5 is the most acceptable) and each recommended hygiene practice received an average score between 3.8 and 5. 74% (134/180) of participants reported increasing their hygienic practices after education. 96% (180/188) of participants indicated they were satisifed to have received the education. 98% (187/190) thought more women should receive this education during prenatal care. Conclusion: Pregnant women viewed education about CMV favorably and increased the frequency of recommended hygiene practices. Introducing an educational handout to routine prenatal care may be beneficial in increasing awareness of CMV infection in pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1205-1214
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Women's Health
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
W e would like to thank all the women who participated in this study . Research was approved by the University of Minnesota Internal Review Board study identification number 00002735. Research reported in this publication was supported by NIH grant P30CA077598 utilizing the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core shared resource of the Masonic Cancer Center , University of Minnesota and by the National Center for Advancing T ranslational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health A ward Number UL1-TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Grant support: R01 R01 HD098866 (MRS). This work was also supported by the University of South Carolina’ s Disability Research and Dissemination Center (DRDC) through its Cooperative Agreement (Number 6U19DD001218) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Jamie McNew Educational Endowment fund for CMV research is gratefully acknowledged (http://cmv .umn.edu/mcnew-lecture ). These data were presented in abstract/poster format at The Pregnancy Meeting of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine in February 6, 2020, in Grapevine, TX and at the University of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics “PRESS” Conference, Masonic Children’ s Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, April 24, 2020.

Funding Information:
We would like to thank all the women who participated in this study. Research was approved by the University of Minnesota Internal Review Board study identification number 00002735. Research reported in this publication was supported by NIH grant P30CA077598 utilizing the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core shared resource of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1-TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Grant support: R01 R01 HD098866 (MRS). This work was also supported by the University of South Carolina?s Disability Research and Dissemination Center (DRDC) through its Cooperative Agreement (Number 6U19DD001218) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Jamie McNew Educational Endowment fund for CMV research is gratefully acknowledged (http://cmv.umn.edu/mcnew-lecture). These data were presented in abstract/poster format at The Pregnancy Meeting of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine in February 6, 2020, in Grapevine, TX and at the University of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics ?PRESS? Conference, Masonic Children?s Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, April 24, 2020. Disclosure Mark Schleiss reports personal fees from Moderna Vaccines and grants from NIH during the conduct of the study and advises this work was also supported by the University of South Carolina?s Disability Research and Dissemination Center (DRDC) through its Cooperative Agreement (Number 6U19DD001218) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The authors report no other potential conflicts of interest in this work.

Funding Information:
Mark Schleiss reports personal fees from Moderna V accines and grants from NIH during the conduct of the study and advises this work was also supported by the University of South Carolina’ s Disability Research and Dissemination Center (DRDC) through its Cooperative Agreement (Number 6U19DD001218) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The authors report no other potential conflicts of interest in this work.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Schaefer et al.

Keywords

  • CMV education
  • CMV pregnancy
  • CMV vaccine
  • Congenital CMV

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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