Developing a Protein Scaffolding System for Rapid Enzyme Immobilization and Optimization of Enzyme Functions for Biocatalysis

Guoqiang Zhang, Timothy Johnston, Maureen B. Quin, Claudia Schmidt-Dannert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Immobilization of enzymes is required for most biocatalytic processes, but chemistries used in enzyme immobilization are limited and can be challenging. Genetically encoded protein-based biomaterials could provide easy-to-use immobilization platforms for biocatalysts. We recently developed a self-assembling protein scaffold that covalently immobilized SpyTagged enzymes by engineering the bacterial microcompartment protein EutM from Salmonella enterica with a SpyCatcher domain. We also identified a range of EutM homologues as robust protein nanostructures with diverse architectures and electrostatic surface properties. In this work, we created a modular immobilization platform with tunable surface properties by developing a toolbox of self-assembling, robust EutM-SpyCatcher scaffolds. Using an alcohol dehydrogenase as model biocatalyst, we show that the scaffolds improve enzyme activity and stability. This work provides a modular, easy-to-use immobilization system that can be tailored for the optimal function of biocatalysts of interest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1867-1876
Number of pages10
JournalACS Synthetic Biology
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 16 2019

Fingerprint

Biocatalysis
Enzyme immobilization
Biocatalysts
Immobilization
Enzymes
Scaffolds
Proteins
Surface properties
Surface Properties
Salmonella
Enzyme activity
Scaffolds (biology)
Biomaterials
Immobilized Enzymes
Bacterial Proteins
Alcohol Dehydrogenase
Electrostatics
Nanostructures
Biocompatible Materials
Alcohols

Keywords

  • alcohol dehydrogenase
  • biocatalysis
  • enzyme
  • immobilization
  • protein scaffolds
  • synthetic biology

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Developing a Protein Scaffolding System for Rapid Enzyme Immobilization and Optimization of Enzyme Functions for Biocatalysis. / Zhang, Guoqiang; Johnston, Timothy; Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia.

In: ACS Synthetic Biology, Vol. 8, No. 8, 16.08.2019, p. 1867-1876.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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