Determining an association between having a medical home and uncontrolled asthma in US school-aged children: A population-based study using data from the national survey of children's health

M. Nawal Lutfiyya, Nicole Scott, Brett Hurliman, Joel Emery McCullough, Howard Jerome Zeitz, Martin S. Lipsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians believe that infants, children, and adolescents benefi t from having a medical home, characterized by accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective care. Several studies suggest that patients with asthma benefi t from having a medical home. However, no national study has been conducted examining the relationships between having a medical home and asthma control in school-aged children with asthma. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that having an adequate medical home is protective against uncontrolled asthma in children. Methods: To test this hypothesis, cross-sectional data from the 2003-2004 National Survey of Children's Health were analyzed. Analyses entailed creating the variables "medical home" as well as "uncontrolled asthma" from multiple variables. Multivariate analysis was performed using children with uncontrolled asthma as the dependent variable. Results: The logistic regression model performed yielded that school-aged children with uncontrolled asthma were more likely to: speak a primary language other than English (OR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.045-1.093); live in households with incomes < 100% of the federal poverty level (FPL) (OR, 1.826; 95% CI, 1.810-1.842); not have health insurance (OR, 2.296; 95% CI, 2.263-2.330); live in rural rather than metropolitan areas (OR, 1.275; 95% CI, 1.262-1.287); and be non-Caucasian (OR, 2.067; 95% CI, 2.050-2.085). Multivariate analysis also yielded that children with uncontrolled asthma were more likely to have a medical home (OR, 1.138; 95% CI, 1.128-1.148). Conclusions: After controlling for possible confounding variables, this study did not detect an association between having a medical home and asthma control for children with asthma aged 5 to 17 years. Additional research should examine the relationship between variables, such as poverty, place of residence, health insurance status, and the medical home, not only in the instance of uncontrolled asthma, but for other childhood health conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-101
Number of pages8
JournalPostgraduate medicine
Volume122
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Medical home
  • Pediatric asthma
  • Pediatric patient population

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Determining an association between having a medical home and uncontrolled asthma in US school-aged children: A population-based study using data from the national survey of children's health'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this