Determination of traits associated with leafhopper (Empoasca fabae and Empoasca kraemeri) resistance and dissection of leafhopper damage symptoms in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

J. D. Murray, T. E. Michaels, K. P. Pauls, A. W. Schaafsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The typical presentation of potato leafhopper injury in beans includes necrosis at the leaf margins (leaf bum or hopperbum), and downward curling or "cupping" of the leaves. To evaluate potato leafhopper damage a visual score that combines the overall severity of leaf bum, leaf curling and stunting symptoms is usually used. Nonetheless, it may be useful to evaluate these symptoms separately since they may be the result of separate mechanisms of damage, controlled by separate genes. A population of 108 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), derived from a cross between a leafhopper-susceptible Ontario cultivar (Berna) and a resistant line (EMP 419) were scored for injury after natural infestation with Empoasca fabae in Canada and Empoasca kraemeri in Colombia. Leaf burn and leaf curl were significantly rank-correlated (0.37 - 0.74, P < 0.001) in all environments. However, several RILs consistently exhibited high scores for leaf curl but low values for leaf burn, which suggests that genetic dissection of these characters may be possible. Indeterminate growth habit was associated with slightly lower damage scores in Colombia and Ontario, Canada (P < 0.05) while white-seeded lines had lower damage scores in Colombia (P < 0.05). The resistant parental line had significantly lower nymph counts than did the susceptible parent. A positive relationship between damage scores and nymph counts was also observed in the F3 families and the F5:6 RILs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-327
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Volume139
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Empoasca fabae
  • Empoasca kraemeri
  • Insect resistance
  • Phaseolus vulgaris

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